Tag Archive for: Tips for sleeping

5 Easy Steps to Better Sleep: Insights from Comprehensive Sleep Care Center

5 Steps to Better Sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep is crucial for maintaining overall health and well-being. Yet, many of us struggle with achieving restful sleep consistently. Here are five easy steps to improve your sleep, inspired by the experts at Comprehensive Sleep Care Center.

1. Create a Consistent Sleep Schedule

One of the most effective ways to improve your sleep is by maintaining a regular sleep schedule. Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day, even on weekends. This helps regulate your body’s internal clock and can improve the quality of your sleep over time.

Tip: Set a reminder an hour before bedtime to start winding down. Avoid activities that can delay your sleep, such as working late, watching intense shows, or using electronic devices.

2. Optimize Your Sleep Environment

Your bedroom environment plays a significant role in how well you sleep. Aim to create a quiet, dark, and cool environment. Consider using blackout curtains, earplugs, or a white noise machine to block out disturbances.

Tip: Invest in a comfortable mattress and pillows that provide adequate support. The right bedding can make a big difference in your overall sleep quality.

3. Watch What You Eat and Drink

What you consume before bedtime can significantly impact your sleep. Avoid large meals, caffeine, and alcohol close to bedtime. While alcohol might make you feel sleepy initially, it can disrupt your sleep cycle later in the night.

Tip: Opt for light snacks if you’re hungry before bed. Foods rich in magnesium, such as bananas or a small handful of nuts, can help promote relaxation and better sleep.

4. Develop a Relaxing Bedtime Routine

Creating a calming pre-sleep routine can signal to your body that it’s time to wind down. Engage in relaxing activities such as reading a book, taking a warm bath, or practicing meditation or gentle yoga.

Tip: Keep your routine consistent to train your body to recognize these activities as precursors to sleep. Avoid screens during this time, as the blue light emitted by phones and tablets can interfere with your ability to fall asleep.

5. Manage Stress and Anxiety

Stress and anxiety are common culprits of poor sleep. Finding effective ways to manage stress can significantly improve your sleep quality. Techniques such as deep breathing exercises, mindfulness meditation, and journaling can help reduce stress levels.

Tip: Establish a “worry time” earlier in the day where you can jot down any concerns or to-do lists. This practice can help clear your mind and prevent these thoughts from interfering with your sleep.

Conclusion

Achieving better sleep doesn’t have to be complicated. By implementing these five easy steps from the Comprehensive Sleep Care Center, you can create healthier sleep habits and enjoy the benefits of restorative rest. Remember, consistency is key. Make these practices a part of your daily routine, and you’ll be on your way to better sleep in no time.

For more personalized advice and sleep solutions, consider consulting with the professionals at Comprehensive Sleep Care Center. Sweet dreams!

Snooze Away Stress: Combating Insomnia for Stress Awareness Month

Snooze Away Stress: Combating Insomnia for Stress Awareness Month

April is Stress Awareness Month as the month unfolds, it’s imperative to shine a light on the profound impact stress has on our sleep, particularly in the realm of insomnia. Comprehensive Sleep Care Center is here to shed light on this issue and offer practical tips to help you reclaim restful nights and tackle stress head-on.

Understanding Insomnia and Its Link to Stress:

Insomnia, characterized by difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, is often intricately intertwined with stress. The relentless chatter of worries and anxieties can hijack our minds, making it nearly impossible to unwind and drift into slumber. Moreover, the vicious cycle emerges as insufficient sleep exacerbates stress, creating a challenging cycle to break.

Tips to Combat Insomnia and Reduce Stress:

  • Establish a Relaxing Bedtime Routine:

    • Prioritize winding down before bed with calming activities such as reading, gentle stretching, or practicing mindfulness meditation.
    • Steer clear of stimulating activities like scrolling through your phone or watching intense TV shows, as they can hinder your ability to unwind.
  • Create a Comfortable Sleep Environment:

    • Ensure your bedroom is conducive to sleep by keeping it cool, dark, and quiet.
    • Invest in a comfortable mattress and pillows that support your body and promote relaxation.
  • Stick to a Consistent Sleep Schedule:

    • Aim to go to bed and wake up at the same time each day, even on weekends.
    • Consistency reinforces your body’s internal clock, helping regulate your sleep-wake cycle and enhance sleep quality.
  • Limit Exposure to Stimulants:

    • Minimize consumption of caffeine and nicotine, especially in the afternoon and evening, as they can interfere with your ability to fall asleep.
    • Similarly, avoid heavy meals and excessive fluids close to bedtime to prevent discomfort and disruptions during the night.
  • Manage Stress Through Healthy Coping Mechanisms:

    • Practice stress-reduction techniques such as deep breathing exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, or engaging in hobbies you enjoy.
    • Seek support from friends, family, or a mental health professional to address underlying stressors and develop effective coping strategies.

This Stress Awareness Month, let’s prioritize the critical relationship between stress, insomnia, and overall well-being. By implementing these tips and fostering healthy sleep habits, you can empower yourself to break free from the grip of stress and reclaim restorative sleep. Remember, Comprehensive Sleep Care Center is here to support you on your journey to better sleep. Here’s to snoozing away stress and embracing a life of vitality and resilience!

Improve Sleep with Background Noises

Sleep-Friendly Background Noises

In the fast-paced world we live in, finding the perfect environment for a restful night’s sleep can be challenging. External noises, be it traffic, neighbors, or other disturbances, often infiltrate our homes, disrupting the tranquility we need for quality rest. This is where background noise comes to the rescue. But not all background noises are created equal. In this post, we will delve into the realm of sleep-friendly sounds, exploring white noise, grey noise, and pink noise, and how they can contribute to a more peaceful sleep experience.

1.White Noise: A Blanket of Sound

White noise is perhaps the most well-known and widely used sleep aid. It is a constant sound that covers a broad frequency range, effectively drowning out other disruptive noises. The term “white” refers to the way white noise encompasses all audible frequencies, much like white light comprises all visible colors.

Common examples include the hum of a fan, static on a television, or the sound of rain. The consistent nature of white noise helps create a masking effect, making it easier for individuals to ignore other environmental sounds and fall into a deeper sleep.

2. Grey Noise: A Balanced Blend

Grey noise takes the concept of white noise a step further by adjusting the intensity of different frequencies. While white noise has equal intensity across all frequencies, grey noise has a more balanced distribution. This can result in a smoother sound that some find less harsh or abrupt. Grey noise still maintains the ability to mask other disturbances, making it a great alternative for those seeking a more nuanced background noise for sleep. Some people find grey noise to be more soothing and less fatiguing than white noise over extended periods.

Here are some examples of grey noise:

  1. Ocean Waves
  2. Fire Crackling
  3. Distant Thunder

These examples showcase the diverse sources of grey noise found in nature, each offering a balanced and soothing auditory backdrop. Incorporating such sounds into your sleep environment or relaxation routine may contribute to a more peaceful and restful experience.

3. Pink Noise: A Gentle Lullaby

Pink noise is characterized by its lower frequency emphasis, with higher intensity in the lower frequency range. This makes it sound deeper and more soothing, often likened to the rustling of leaves, a gentle waterfall, or steady rainfall. Pink noise is believed to have a calming effect on the brain, promoting relaxation and, ultimately, a more restful sleep. Research suggests that pink noise may improve sleep quality and enhance memory consolidation during sleep.

Pink Noise Generators:

There are electronic devices and apps specifically designed to produce pink noise.

Incorporating pink noise into your sleep routine or relaxation practices may contribute to a more tranquil and calming experience.

Choosing the Right Noise for You:

As we navigate the challenges of modern life, prioritizing quality sleep becomes increasingly important. The use of background noise, whether it’s the consistent hum of white noise, the balanced blend of grey noise, or the gentle lullaby of pink noise, can significantly contribute to creating a conducive sleep environment. Consider incorporating these sleep-friendly sounds into your nightly routine and experience the soothing symphony that leads to a more restful and rejuvenating sleep.

If you find that you are still having difficulty getting a good night’s sleep. Comprehensive Sleep Care Center providers are here to help you Say Hello to Sleep Again.

 

Top Ten Foods to Avoid for a Good Night’s Sleep

Top Ten foods to avoid to get a good night’s sleep

Do you find yourself tossing and turning at night, struggling to get a good night’s sleep? The solution might be as simple as watching what you eat before bedtime. What you consume in the hours leading up to sleep can have a significant impact on the quality of your slumber. At Comprehensive Sleep Care Center, we understand the importance of a restful night’s sleep, which is why we’re here to help you make informed choices about your pre-sleep snacks. In this blog, we’ll explore the top ten foods to avoid before bedtime to ensure you wake up feeling refreshed and rejuvenated.

1. Caffeine

It’s no surprise that caffeine tops our list. Coffee, tea, and even some sodas contain caffeine, a stimulant that can disrupt your sleep. The half-life of caffeine varies from person to person, but it can remain in your system for several hours, affecting your ability to fall asleep and the quality of your sleep once you do.

2. Alcohol

While a nightcap may seem like a good idea, alcohol can disrupt your sleep cycle. It may initially make you feel drowsy, but it can lead to fragmented and less restorative sleep. To enjoy a better night’s sleep, consider limiting alcohol intake, especially in the hours leading up to bedtime.

3. Spicy Foods

Spicy foods can cause heartburn and indigestion, making it difficult to relax and fall asleep comfortably. Avoid spicy dishes before bedtime and opt for milder alternatives to prevent these discomforts.

4. High-Fat Foods

High-fat foods, such as greasy or fried items, can be difficult to digest and may lead to discomfort during the night. These foods can also trigger acid reflux, leading to disrupted sleep. Opt for lighter, easily digestible meals closer to bedtime.

5. Heavy or Large Meals

Eating large meals or heavy portions late at night can be problematic for your sleep. Your body works to digest the food, which can cause discomfort and even lead to sleep-disrupting heartburn. Try to finish your last substantial meal at least 2-3 hours before bedtime.

6. Sugary Snacks

Sugary treats like candy, chocolate, and desserts can lead to energy spikes and crashes, making it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep. High sugar consumption before bed can also lead to nighttime awakenings, so choose healthier options for your evening snacks.

7. Citrus Fruits

Citrus fruits, like oranges and grapefruits, are acidic and can cause heartburn or acid reflux. If you’re prone to these conditions, it’s best to avoid citrus fruits before bedtime.

8. Tomatoes

Tomatoes are also acidic and can contribute to heartburn, especially when consumed close to bedtime. Consider limiting tomato-based sauces or dishes in the evening.

9. High-Protein Foods

Protein takes longer to digest than carbohydrates, and consuming too much protein late at night can make it challenging to fall asleep. If you want a bedtime snack, choose something light and low in protein.

10. Carbonated Drinks

Carbonated beverages, such as soda and sparkling water, can lead to gas and bloating, which can be uncomfortable while trying to sleep. Opt for plain water or herbal tea as a more sleep-friendly choice.

 

A good night’s sleep is crucial for your physical and mental well-being, and what you eat before bedtime can significantly affect the quality of your rest. Avoiding caffeine, alcohol, spicy, high-fat, and heavy meals, as well as sugary snacks, citrus fruits, tomatoes, high-protein foods, and carbonated drinks can go a long way in promoting better sleep. Instead, consider lighter, sleep-friendly alternatives like herbal tea, whole-grain crackers, or a small portion of a dairy product.

At Comprehensive Sleep Care Center, we encourage you to make mindful choices about your pre-sleep snacks and invest in the restorative sleep your body deserves. If you have sleep related issues contact our sleep medicine providers at Comprehensive Sleep Care Center and Say Hello to Sleep Again…

 

Ten Tips to Beat Insomnia

Ten Tips to Beat Insomnia

An estimated forty million Americans deal with insomnia each year. Below we will touch on some tips to help you beat insomnia.

Chronic insomnia can have a negative impact on your health. It can increase your risk of depression and high blood pressure. Insomnia also can lower your quality of life.

Common symptoms of insomnia include:

  • Fatigue
  • Inability to focus or concentrate
  • Poor memory
  • Mood disturbance
  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Low motivation or energy
  • Increased errors or accidents

Insomnia can be a frustrating and challenging condition, but there are several strategies you can try to help manage it.

Here are some tips for dealing with insomnia:

  1. Stick to a regular sleep schedule: Establish a consistent sleep routine by going to bed and waking up at the same time every day, even on weekends. This helps regulate your body’s internal clock and improve your sleep quality over time.
  2. Create a sleep-friendly environment: Make your bedroom conducive to sleep. Keep the room cool, dark, and quiet. Use comfortable bedding and invest in a good mattress and pillow. Consider using earplugs, an eye mask, or a white noise machine if necessary.
  3. Limit exposure to screens before bed: The blue light emitted by electronic devices can interfere with your sleep. Avoid using smartphones, tablets, computers, and TVs at least an hour before bedtime. Instead, engage in relaxing activities like reading a book or taking a warm bath.
  4. Avoid stimulating substances: Reduce or eliminate the consumption of caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol, especially in the evening. These substances can disrupt your sleep patterns and make it harder to fall asleep or stay asleep throughout the night.
  5. Establish a pre-sleep routine: Engage in relaxing activities before bed to signal to your body that it is time to wind down. This could include listening to calming music, practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing or meditation, or doing gentle stretches.
  6. Create a comfortable mindset: If racing thoughts or anxiety keep you awake at night, try keeping a journal or writing down your worries before bed. This can help clear your mind and alleviate stress. You may also find it helpful to practice mindfulness or engage in cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques.
  7. Exercise regularly: Regular physical activity can improve sleep quality. However, try to complete your exercise routine at least a few hours before bedtime, as exercising too close to bedtime can have a stimulating effect.
  8. Avoid napping: If you are having trouble sleeping at night, it is best to avoid daytime napping. If you do need to nap, limit it to a short duration (around 20-30 minutes) and schedule it earlier in the day.
  9. Consider your sleep environment: Evaluate your bedroom for factors that may be disrupting your sleep, such as uncomfortable temperatures, noise, or an unsupportive mattress. Make any necessary adjustments to create a more sleep-friendly environment.
  10. Consult a healthcare professional: If your insomnia persists despite your efforts, it may be beneficial to consult a healthcare professional. They can help identify any underlying causes and suggest further treatment options, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) or medication if appropriate.

Remember that everyone’s sleep needs are different, so it may take some time and experimentation to find what works best for you.

If your symptoms continue consult a sleep medicine center that is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Comprehensive Sleep Care Center has 10 convenient locations.

  • Virginia- Alexandria, Arlington, Chantilly, Dumfries, Fredericksburg, Lansdowne, Manassas, Woodbridge
  • Maryland – Bethesda, Germantown

 

Why am I so tired but I can’t sleep at night?

Why am I so tired but I can’t sleep at night? There can be several reasons why you might be having difficulty sleeping at night.

Here are a few common factors that can contribute to sleep problems:

  1. Stress and Anxiety: Stressful life events, work pressure, or personal issues can make it difficult to relax and fall asleep. Anxiety about the day ahead or general worry can keep your mind active and prevent you from falling asleep easily.
  2. Poor Sleep Habits: Irregular sleep schedule, consuming caffeine or stimulating substances close to bedtime, using electronic devices (such as smartphones or laptops) before bed, or having an uncomfortable sleep environment can disrupt your sleep.
  3. Medical Conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as insomnia, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, chronic pain, or psychiatric disorders, can interfere with sleep. If you suspect a medical condition is causing your sleep problems, it’s advisable to consult a sleep medicine professional.
  4. Environmental Factors: External factors like excessive noise, uncomfortable room temperature, or an uncomfortable mattress and pillow can affect your ability to fall asleep and stay asleep.
  5. Poor Sleep Hygiene: Not following good sleep hygiene practices can disrupt your sleep. This includes having an irregular sleep schedule, not maintaining a relaxing bedtime routine, or engaging in stimulating activities before bed.
  6. Medications or Substances: Certain medications, such as antidepressants, can interfere with sleep. Additionally, substances like nicotine, alcohol, and certain stimulants can disrupt your sleep patterns.

Each night millions of people in the U.S. struggle to fall asleep or stay asleep. For some, this is only a brief problem. For others, it can be insomnia.

If you’re consistently having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep help is available:

  • Talk to your doctor about any ongoing sleep problems. Ask about the sleep-related side effects of your medications.
  • Contact a sleep disorders center that is accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Here are 8 tips to better sleep.

8 Tips to Improve Your Sleep

8 Tips to Improve Your Sleep

Research suggests that 40% of the adult population does not get the recommended 7-8 hours of quality sleep each night. So what can you do to improve your sleep?

Healthy sleep habits can make a big difference in your quality of life. Getting the recommended amount of sleep on a regular basis is linked with better health, including improved attention and memory, the ability to control emotions, your overall quality of life, and mental and physical health.

Adults that regularly get less than seven hours of sleep a night have been linked with poor health, including weight gain, having a body mass index of 30 or higher, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and depression.

Almost all of us could use a better night’s sleep. Yet improving your sleep can seem like a daunting, complicated, and even impossible task. Luckily, there are a few basic, easy to follow tips that can help to improve sleep.

HERE ARE 8 TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR SLEEP:

  1. Turn off the tech. The blue light emitted from screens wakes you up and turning on night mode doesn’t solve the problem. Watching shows or reading articles stimulates the brain and makes it harder to fall asleep. Try reading a familiar book instead.

 

  1. Keep a consistent sleep schedule. This helps to regulate your body’s clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night.

 

  1. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. A relaxing wind down routine before bedtime, conducted away from bright lights, helps separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety which can make it more difficult to fall asleep, get sound and deep sleep, or remain asleep.

 

  1. Exercise daily. Exercise and sleep are both part of a healthy lifestyle. But exercise can interfere with a good night’s rest if it’s done too close to bedtime. Avoid exercise at least 3 hours before you plan on sleeping. This allows your body enough time to relax before falling asleep.

 

  1. Improve your sleep environmentDesign your sleep environment to establish the conditions you need for sleep. Your bedroom should be cool – between 65 and 68 degrees. Your bedroom should also be free from any noise that can disturb your sleep. Finally, your bedroom should be free from any light. Check your room for noises or other distractions. This includes a bed partner’s sleep disruptions such as snoring. Consider using blackout curtains, eye shades, ear plugs, “white noise” machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices.

 

  1. Sleep on a comfortable mattress. Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 8 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses.

 

  1. Watch your diet before bed. Eating big or spicy meals can cause discomfort from indigestion that can make it hard to sleep. If you can, avoid eating large meals for two to three hours before bedtime. Try a light snack 45 minutes before bed if you’re still hungry.

 

  1. Avoid liquids an hour before bed. Hydration is important, but so is sleep. Go to the bathroom right before bed to avoid waking up in the middle of the night.

Change doesn’t happen immediately. It takes commitment and repetition, but ultimately following these simple rules can help you sleep better.

If you’re still having trouble sleeping, don’t hesitate to speak with your doctor or to call one of our sleep medicine specialists here at Comprehensive Sleep Care Center. It could be a more serious sleep disorder like sleep apnea or chronic insomnia.

Sleep can help beat the Coronavirus

Sleep Can Help Beat The Coronavirus

A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP CAN HELP YOU FIGHT VIRUSES

Sleep is always important, but right now it plays an integral role in our immune system. Eating right, exercising, and quality sleep all increase the body’s immune system. Quality sleep can also affect how fast a person recovers if they do get sick. Whereas lack of sleep can weaken the immune system, making people more vulnerable. Studies show that people who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to get sick after being exposed to a virus, such as the common cold, or Coronavirus.

In these times of crisis and stress, our basic needs sometimes go out the window. People are struggling with the myriad of changes in their daily lives due to COVID-19.  From healthcare workers working extra-long and stressful hours. Parents at home with children, struggling to keep them busy. Or those locked down at home binge watching shows or Doomscrolling day and night.

These stresses can significantly impact the quality and duration of our sleep. Lack of sleep, whether from added stress or a significant change in your daily schedule, can have a severe impact on our physical and mental health at a time when we need to be our strongest. A sleep-deprived immune system just doesn’t work as well. Long-term lack of sleep also increases the risk of obesity, diabetes, and heart and cardiovascular disease.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 35.2% of adults in the United States are getting less than 7 hours of sleep each night. The optimal amount of sleep for most adults is seven to eight hours of quality sleep each night. Teenagers need nine to 10 hours of sleep. School-aged children may need 10 or more hours of sleep.

It can be easy to lose sight of how changes in our daily habits influence our ability to sleep well. The concept of sleep hygiene focuses on how to use your habits and routines to your advantage when it comes to sleep. It also includes optimizing your sleep environment so that you can relax and rest easy when you turn in for the night.

Here are some tips for getting a better night’s sleep:

  1. Stick to a sleep schedule – same bed/wake time, even on the weekends
  2. Dim the lights 2-3 hours before bedtime to stimulate the release of melatonin
  3. Power off all electronic devices 60 minutes prior to bedtime
  4. Create a relaxing pre-bedtime routine
  5. Watch nighttime fluid intake – drink enough fluids, but not so close to bedtime
  6. Avoid naps especially in late afternoon
  7. Exercise daily- but if possible, not within 2-3 hours of bedtime
  8. Get plenty of sunshine
  9. Create a comfortable sleep environment
  10. Avoid alcohol, cigarettes, and heavy meals in the evening
  11. If you can’t sleep, get out of bed and do something relaxing until you feel tired
  12. Keep a sleep diary to help evaluate common patterns.

 

Stress and sleep are closely linked. We hope that these trying times soon will pass. But if your sleep issues continue, contact one of our Sleep Medicine Professionals. Stay safe out there.

SLEEP ISSUES AND CORONAVIRUS

SLEEP ISSUES AND CORONAVIRUS

As we try to navigate the day to day complexities of the Coronavirus pandemic and our new normal, it’s only natural to worry and this can cause you to have sleep issues.  Many are experiencing uncertainty and a loss of control. People are afraid for themselves, their loved ones and their jobs. Coronavirus and sleep issues seem to be working together to cause even more problems.

The Coronavirus pandemic has created so much uncertainty in our lives, it’s leading to many disruptions and is taking a toll on our sleep. Good, quality sleep is essential.  It is a key to wellness, both physical and mental, helping to beat back stress, depression, and anxiety.

Most adults need 7-8 hours of quality sleep each night. But millions of people suffered from insomnia before the coronavirus, and unfortunately, the pandemic creates a host of new challenges even for people who previously had no sleeping problems.

Whether you’ve had sleeping problems before COVID-19, or if they’ve only come on recently, there are many steps that you can take to help improve your sleep quality during this global pandemic.

Improve Your Sleep Issues:

  • Stick to a sleep schedule, roughly the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends. This helps to regulate your body’s clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night. This is also important for kids during the pandemic upheaval.
  • Turn off technology before bedtime including the television, tablets, smartphones and other devices. The blue light that is emitted can delay the release of melatonin in the body, increase alertness and can even reset the body’s internal clock to a later schedule, disrupting the natural circadian rhythm. In addition the constant stream of bad news can make falling asleep difficult.
  • Exercise daily. Regular physical activity can greatly improve the quality and duration of your sleep. It can also help control your stress and anxiety. However, exercising immediately before bed can stimulate your body, so be sure to finish your workout several hours before bed.
  • If you can’t sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired. It is best to take work materials, computers and televisions out of the sleeping environment. Use your bed only for sleep to strengthen the association between bed and sleep. If you associate a particular activity or item with anxiety about sleeping, omit it from your bedtime routine
  • Try a calming app. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, stressed or anxious, try utilizing a relaxation app during the day to help with any anxiety, fear or apprehension. Don’t be afraid to incorporate some relaxation techniques into your bedtime ritual.
  • Avoid or limit naps. Frequent napping can affect the quality of nighttime sleep. However, if you do enjoy a nap make sure it’s no longer than 30 minutes.
  • Regulate temperatures. Make sure the temperature in your bedroom or home isn’t too hot. It’s been suggested that the optimal bedroom temperature should be between 66-69 degrees Fahrenheit for ideal sleeping conditions.
  • Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 9 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses. Have comfortable pillows and make the room attractive and inviting for sleep but also free of allergens that might affect you. Also, remove any objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you have to get up during the night.
  • No food or drink right before bed. It’s best to avoid alcohol and stimulants like caffeine or nicotine. The effects of these items could last for hours and cause difficulty initiating sleep or even cause frequent awakenings. Also, try not to eat large meals or spicy food before retiring for the night. These could activate your digestive system, causing reflux or heartburn and keep you awake.

Look For the Good News

Despite all the bad news that you may come across, try to find some positive stories, such as how people are supporting one another through the pandemic. You can use technology to stay in touch with friends and family so that you can maintain social connections despite the need for social distancing.

Contact Your Doctor if Necessary

If you’re still having trouble sleeping, don’t hesitate to speak with your doctor or to call one of our sleep medicine specialists here at Comprehensive Sleep Care Center. It could be a more serious sleep disorder like sleep apnea or chronic insomnia. Our doctors are available for virtual telehealth visits as well as in-person appointments.

Doomscrolling it’s Affecting your Sleep Health

Doomscrolling it’s affecting your Sleep Health

 Doomscrolling is a new term referring to the habit of scrolling through bad news, even though that news is saddening, disheartening, or depressing. Large numbers of people are finding themselves reading continuously bad news. The Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated this habit with people stranded in their homes increasing  the ever scrolling of Google news, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.  The news cycle has gotten more intense and the constant stream of bad news and social media never ends. And so, unfortunately, so does our morbid curiosity or fear of missing out on something important. This self-destructive behavior of Doomscrolling can seriously disrupt your sleep and your overall health.

This constant barrage of bad news can lead to difficulty falling asleep and eventually insomnia. Poor sleep can provoke symptoms of depression in some individuals. Chronic sleep problems can exacerbate depression, leading to a negative cycle between depression and sleep that can be challenging to break.

Doomscrolling can increase levels of cortisol and adrenaline, which are stress hormones. Research has shown that chronic levels of elevated stress hormones are associated with many physical health issues, including heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.

So, what can you do to scroll without so much doom?

It is important to our overall health and wellbeing that we practice self-care and find balance in our lives. One good solution is by logging off. Start by cutting back and creating boundaries for your social media and news scrolling use. Do your best to not scroll the 2 hours before bedtime. It is not only the doom and gloom of the media, but using tablets, smartphones, laptops, or other electronic devices before bed delays your body’s internal clock (circadian rhythm), which suppresses the release of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin, making it even more difficult to fall asleep.

10 Tips to Better Sleep

Swap out the doom and gloom with happier things

Whether it’s connecting with family or sending funny memes to friends, these are the things we should try and spend more time doing. This will help to build up more positive emotions in our lives. And who couldn’t use more of those?

If you feel you may have a sleep problem. Call our office and make an appointment with one of our sleep medicine professionals. We currently have Tele Medicine Virtual visits as well as in-office appointments. Let us help you to Say Hello to Sleep Again.

Comprehensive Sleep Care Center has 9 locations in Virginia and Maryland (Alexandria, Arlington, Bethesda, Chantilly, Dumfries, Germantown, Lansdowne, Manassas, Woodbridge).